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Patricia Fortlage_Windmill Joiner_Your Shot_2016.jpg

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While spending some time in the California Central Valley farm belt, I began to notice windmills everywhere. Many farms had them and even more individual yards had them. Some were being used to generate power, but most seem to simply represent the idea of generation. Perhaps a symbol of a time when farming was prosperous in the valley. I thought it would be interesting to create a symbol of the symbol... an abstract joiner to represent the idea of generation.

Thus, I set out to photograph 30-100 images of each part (blades, carriage, head, tail, upper legs, lower legs, dirt on the ground) from different angles and heights of one single large windmill located in Escalon, a small town in the Central Valley. I then ordered prints of each of my favorite pieces and physically patch worked them into a composite image. My goal was not only to take a multitude of images with different angles, depths, sizes and distances, but also to pull them together in a way that actually represented not only the shape of the original windmill, but also the movement of the windmill as well. Once I had everything physically composited into place, I took one final image of the piece as a whole. Lastly, I straightened and lightened the final single exposure image slightly in Photoshop.
Copyright
Patricia Fortlage 2016All Rights Reserved
Image Size
3921x5881 / 6.8MB
Contained in galleries
Abstract Fine Art, Contemporary Art
While spending some time in the California Central Valley farm belt, I began to notice windmills everywhere.  Many farms had them and even more individual yards had them.  Some were being used to generate power, but most seem to simply represent the idea of generation.  Perhaps a symbol of a time when farming was prosperous in the valley.  I thought it would be interesting to create a symbol of the symbol... an abstract joiner to represent the idea of generation.<br />
<br />
Thus, I set out to photograph 30-100 images of each part (blades, carriage, head, tail, upper legs, lower legs, dirt on the ground) from different angles and heights of one single large windmill located in Escalon, a small town in the Central Valley.  I then ordered prints of each of my favorite pieces and physically patch worked them into a composite image.  My goal was not only to take a multitude of images with different angles, depths, sizes and distances, but also to pull them together in a way that actually represented not only the shape of the original windmill, but also the movement of the windmill as well.  Once I had everything physically composited into place, I took one final image of the piece as a whole.  Lastly, I straightened and lightened the final single exposure image slightly in Photoshop.